Insincere Apologies are Trust Killers | Trust in Leadership

I had a chance to sit down with the CEO of Compass Strategic Investments. For six months, he lived and worked in the Netherlands, so he had some cultural observations to share. One of the distinctions that he noticed was that Americans often make insincere apologies. When it comes to building trust, being able to say we’re sorry and doing it sincerely is an important skill. However insincere apologies, those made out of habit or indifference, are trust killers.

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Succinct Speakers at TED | Trusted Communication

 

This week I met up with friend and author, Hayley Foster, pro on developing TED speakers. Her advice for speakers. You must have a core idea that is new. Ideas can change the world. Her best idea, probably formed because TED talks are meant to be so short, YOU CANNOT HAVE ANY EXTRA WORDS. Most Ted talks are 18, 12, or less than 8 minute talks. It is harder to give a short speech than a long on  because it takes more preparation for a short one. If you are a speaker and If your story usually takes minutes to tell, make yourself tell it in 4 lines. Shorten and tighten. Great advice in this attention-span-deprived noisy world.

Pat Summitt: 38 Years of Success | Trust in Sports

After 38 years, the Tennessee Lady Volunteers Basketball players, coaches and community had to say goodbye to the most competent and successful basketball coach, not only in women’s basketball but in NCAA history. Under Pat Summitt’s leadership, the University of Tennessee Lady Vols basketball program was the most elite the nation has ever seen. Young girls from fourth grade on up would attend Summitt’s basketball camps every summer in hopes of learning how to be the best. Any girl who has ever had a passion for the game of basketball has dreams of being a part of that 11 woman roster and the privilege of wearing the orange and baby blue jerseys.

Pat Summitt made an appearance at 31 NCAA Tournaments, 22 teams made it to the Final Four and eight won NCAA Championship titles. At the end of her career Summitt claimed the title of the Most Winningest Coach in NCAA history, above John Wooden and Mike Krzyzewski, with a record of 1098-208 (.841).

What makes Pat Summitt so great? Trust. Summitt’s life and career exude the Eight Pillars of Trust.

Clarity: Summitt had a clear vision and purpose. She “instilled a pattern of success in her players and constantly challenged them to reach their potential as a student and athlete.” Her program reinforces that a clear vision unifies and motivates.

Compassion: Ask any of Pat’s current and former players and each one will tell you that Summitt was the hardest coach but the most loving. “Her players speak of the opportunities afforded to them later in life with a degree in life lessons from Summitt…” Summitt was trusted because she was a selfless and sacrificial leader who thought beyond her own interests.

Character:  Integrity is being the same in thoughts, words, and actions. Pat Summitt never boasted, although proud of her players she was respected for her humility. Her principles and values she carried with her at home, in practice and in games. Her accountability came from a staff that respected her principles and they supported her in them.

Competency: Pat was raised with the principles of hard work, and as a young girl after she finished her farm chores she would end up playing basketball in a hayloft.  “ She was strong … had great instincts … was awesome on defense … took a charge like a greedy housewife … denied the ball all over the court … rebounded with authority … took the ball to the hoop … and then could knock the lights out over a zone defense.” These characteristics led her to playing on the Olympic Women’s basketball team, a four year career in the WNBA and landing a job as the UT Volunteers Women’s basketball coach at the age of 22.

Commitment: Pat is the ultimate picture of commitment. She played basketball for the University of Tennessee for her college career and coached there for 38 years. Summitt’s passion for the game was the reason for such great commitment to the team.

Connection: Pat was one of the best coaches in the NCAA not only because of her knowledge of the game of basketball. She knew that building a great team could only happen through connecting with her players and staff. She cared beyond herself, asked great questions, listened, collaborated, was genuine, was grateful, and made a rule to never complain.

Contribution: Pat was the pioneer of NCAA women’s basketball.  She contributed her life to the game of basketball.  She was known to deliver results, and not just in basketball. At the end of her coaching career she held a record of 1098-208, but one of her greater successes was that her program had a 100% graduation rate. She produced great athletes as well as great minds and leaders to society.

Consistency: Even after the retirement of Pat Summitt, because of the consistency displayed by the University of Tennessee Lady Volunteers basketball team, the program  still has a reputation to be the ideal place to play college basketball.

There are many good coaches and good sports programs. To be considered a great coach, which is trusted by the entire sports world, requires the characteristics of the Eight Pillars of Trust. Pat Summitt exudes trust in leadership. Even now as she begins to battle Alzheimer’s, the sports world trusts that Pat will still work hard, fight hard and never compromise. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmeK-WJklGo

 

-AR

Trust in Leadership, Trust in Sports, Building Trust, commitment, consistency, connection, contribution, character, Pat Summitt, University of Tennessee, Lady Vols Basketball, Pat Summitt Alzheimer’s

Eight Ways to Increase Sales in the Trust Crisis | The Trust Edge

We are in a crisis, and it’s not the financial one. At the World Economic Forum in China, world leaders got it right when they declared that our biggest crisis is a lack of trust and confidence. We are in a trust crisis and few people really understand the bottom line implications.

Trust not only affects credit and government relations, but it also affects every relationship. And as we know, sales is all about relationships, and your primary currency is not money – it’s trust. 

If you think trust is just a “soft skill,” consider the impact of Tiger Woods’ behavior off the golf course, which lost him millions of dollars in just a matter of weeks. One breach of trust at Penn State University could cost them $1 billion over the next decade. If you have a loan on your home, your mortgage payment is based on your credit score, which is essentially a trust score. The more the bank trusts you, the higher the score, the less you pay over the course of the loan. Trust impacts the bottom line.

Sales people can get caught up in seeking the newest sales tactic or closing tech­nique, but without trust, they won’t even get in the door. Without trust, you lose sales. But when individuals acquire what I call the trust edge—the competitive advantage you gain when others have a confident belief in you todo what is rightdeliver what is promised, and to be the same every time, in spite of circumstances—it shows in every relationship, and eventually is demonstrated by increased sales.

Trust is the unique commonality of the most successful sales people. Obtaining this level of trust isn’t easy, so if you are looking for a quick fix, don’t look to trust. Trust is like a forest—it takes a long time to grow, and is easily burned down with a just touch of carelessness. The good news is that we can build this fundamental key to success by building and maintaining eight pillars of trust. 

1. Consistency: In every area of life, it’s the little things—done consistently—that make the big difference. If I am overweight, it is because I have eaten too many calories over time, not because I ate too much yesterday. It is the same in business. The little things done consistently make for increased sales and retention, and a higher level of trust. The great sales people consistently do the small, but most important things first. They make that call and write that thank you note. Do the little things, consistently.

2. Clarity: People trust the clear and mistrust or distrust the ambiguous. Be clear about your mission, purpose, expectations, and daily activities. When a manager is clear in expectations, she will likely get what she wants. When we are clear about priorities on a daily basis, we become productive and effective. When a sales person is clear about the benefits, people buy.

3. Compassion: Think beyond yourself, and never underestimate the power of sincerely caring about another person. People are often skeptical about whether a sales person really has their best interests in mind. “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” is not just an old saying—it is a bottom line truth. If followed, you will build trust.

4. Character: Do what is right over what is easy. Sales people that have built this pillar consistently did what needed to be done when it needed to be done whether they felt like doing it or not. It is the work of life to do what is right over what is easy.

5. Contribution: Few things build trust quicker than actual results. At the end of the day, people need to see outcomes. You can have compassion and character, but without the results you promised, people won’t trust you. Be a contributor that delivers real results.

6. Competency: Staying fresh, relevant and capable builds trust. The humble and teachable person keeps learning new ways of doing things, and stays current on ideas and trends. According to one study, the key competency of new MBA’s is not a specific skill, but rather the ability to learn amidst chaos. Arrogance and a “Been-there-done-that” attitude prevent you from growing, and they compromise others’ confidence in you. There is always more to learn, so make a habit of reading, learning, and listening to fresh information.

7. Connection: People want to follow, buy from, and be around friends – and being friends is all about building a connection. Trust is all about relationships, and relationships are best built by establishing genuine connection. Ask questions, listen, and above all, show gratitude—it’s the primary trait of truly talented connectors. Grateful people are not entitled, they do not complain, and they do not gossip. Develop the trait of gratitude and you will be a magnet.

8.  Commitment: Stick with it through adversity. People trusted General Patton, Martin Luther King Jr., Gandhi, Jesus and George Washington because they saw commitment and sacrifice for the greater good. Commitment builds trust.

Building trust with prospects and clients in this suspicious environment does not start with the economy, government, or even your organization. It starts with YOU—you can build these pillars and enjoy greater relationships, revenue and results.

David Horsager, MA, CSP, is an award-winning speaker, author, producer, and business strategist who has researched and spoken on the bottom-line impact of trust across four continents. He is the author of The Trust Edge: How Top Leaders Gain Faster Results, Deeper Relationships, and a Stronger Bottom Line which gives the framework for building trust at work and at home. Get free resources and more at www.DavidHorsager.com and www.TheTrustEdge.com.

 

Business in China, Penn State, Tiger Woods, Trust in Sales, Commitment, Sales Caffeine

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Do You Trust the NFL? | Trust In Sports

Who do you think the position of the ball should have been awarded to? Should have it been ruled an interception or a touchdown?  

The NFL is apparently closer to reaching a deal with the original referees. The NFL has been using replacement referees from Division III colleges and high schools for the first three weeks of the season. The NFL’s decision to use replacement referees over experienced referees conflicts with the competency pillar. The NFL is trusted to put the best performance on the field including players and yes, referees. How can fans trust the NFL if the officiating of the game is subpar?

 During the Monday Night Football game between the Seahawks and the Packers, Seahawk’s Golden Tate and Packer’s M.D. Jennings both appeared to have caught the ball simultaneously in the end zone in the game’s final play. The replacement referees eventually ruled it a touchdown for Seattle and the Seahawks won the game because of the call.

Football, Monday Night Football,  Packers, Referee, Seahawks,  Trust, NFL, Trust in Sports, Sports, Trust in Leadership, Trust in Media

 

This Single Truth is the Same in EVERY Science | The Trust Edge

Staying fresh and relevant is critical for excellence at whatever field you are in. Hear from Dave on the importance of being competent!
Agriculture, Competency, Desires, Einstein, Fresh and Competent, Science, Thoughts, The Trust Edge, Trust in Business, Business Ethics
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The Single Secret To Growing Revenue and Lowering Cost | The Trust Edge

Every time you find a culture of trust, there are lower costs, higher returns, less overhead and greater impact. This 2 minute video is a great example of what all of my research revealed as far as costs going down when trust goes up!

 http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2012/08/23/gardeners-grow-trust-right-along-with-tomatoes/#.UDem-IaDsG0.email

This does not mean I believe we ought to trust everyone. But where trust increases…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gardening, Marriage, Trust, Dollars, Honor System, Money, Trust in Relationships, Consumer Trust

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The C-Myth: Does Coffee Make Me Smarter And More Energetic? | The Trust Edge

Do you ever feel like you need just one more cup of coffee or 5 hour energy to keep yourself going? Researchers at Johns Hopkins would kindly ask you to reconsider the impact it has on your emotional intelligence (EQ), which can be affected even from 1 cup of coffee.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/travisbradberry/2012/08/21/caffeine-the-silent-killer-of-emotional-intelligence/

 

The Trust Edge, Coffee, Emotional Intelligence, Leadership, Mood, Sleep, Withdrawal

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A Quick Trust Reminder | The Trust Edge

 

Trust, not money, is the currency of business and life. In a climate of trust, people are more creative, motivated, productive, and willing to sacrifice for the team. What happens when a business gains The Trust Edge? Every aspect of business becomes profitable. You must realize the impact of trust and implement the 8 Pillars to gain The Trust Edge

By earning The Trust Edge, you will gain a significant advantage that extends far beyond the bottom line. Our hope is that this foundation of trust will become a part of who you are. To receive a list of 18 ways to build trust, email us at info@davidhorsager.com and put “Tips” in the subject line.

 

The Trust Edge, Trust impacts the bottom line, Trust in Business, As Trust Increases, Increased Productivity, Productive Work, Trust and Money

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